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A rich and storied past

Chateau de Bardouly was built by French nobility between 1580 and 1608.  The de Gastebois family belonged to the royal court throughout the entire reign of the French monarchy.  Paintings depicting family members with the Kings of France can be seen in the Gallerie des Batailles at Versailles.

The land for Bardouly, encompassing thousands of hectares, was ceded to the de Gastebois family by Henry IV.  Our background photo here shows the original deed signed by Henry IV.  Artisans who designed the panelled state rooms in Le Petit Trianon at Versailles also installed the dining room and library at Chateau de Bardouly.

Underneath the house are an extensive series of tunnels originally used during the Catholic-Protestant wars that raged in the area.  During WWII Bardouly served as the centre of the resistance in Southern France.  The underground tunnels were used to hide refugees and allied soldiers.

Charles de Gaulle and John D. Rockefeller were among the illustrious visitors to Bardouly during the 20th century.

Bardouly remained in the de Gastebois family for nearly 400 years.  The current owners purchased the estate in 1999.  They fully renovated the home, employing local artisans to preserve the integrity of the original Chateau.